ElectroIQ White Papers
ElectroIQ White Papers Featured White Papers
Henkel Corporation Logo RoHS Means Big Changes for Power Devices. Are you Ready?
While design and assembly of today’s smaller, higher functioning semiconductor devices continues to be challenging, addressing the thermal requirements of modern power packages from a materials point of view is arguably one of the most pressing issues facing this market sector. The drive toward greater functionality in an ever more miniaturized footprint has accelerated materials innovations so that these essential components of countless consumer and automotive products can continue to provide the reliability and performance to which we have all become accustomed. As if this weren’t enough, the 2014 deadline for RoHS compliance is also looming and adding even more complexity to the materials equation. Though the possibility still remains that exemptions, exceptions and/or extensions may apply to the power device sector, it is critical that packaging specialists have a compliance plan in place.
(Nov 1, 2010, Henkel Corporation)
Henkel Corporation Logo New Die Attach Film Raises the Bar on Wetting and Molding Performance
Complexity, functionality, miniaturization and cost-efficiency have been and continue to
be the mantra of the electronics industry. Arguably, no segment is more keenly aware of
this fact than the semiconductor packaging sector. As die stacks grow in number and,
therefore, wafers become thinner, packaging specialists are forced to find novel
materials and processes that can accommodate these demands cost-effectively. For die
stacking applications that require ultra-thin bondlines and extreme uniformity, die attach
film materials have emerged as one of the more robust solutions to address these
device demands.
(Sep 30, 2010, Henkel Corporation)
µPILR™ Flip Chip for High-Performance Applications
The ever increasing market requirements for high-performance, high speed, and densely packaged devices with shrinking form factors have propelled the use of flip chip technology in electronic packages. Flip chip packaging becomes an attractive choice due to its high packaging density, scalable nature and good thermal and electrical performance from shorter electrical paths between the die and the substrate and enhanced power-ground distribution.
High-performance applications including FPGAs, ASICs, microprocessors and graphic processors are already making a transition towards 150µm bump pitch and below. The industry is moving rapidly towards 28nm nodes with aggressive goals to achieve 22nm nodes. However, the trend towards the smaller form factors and reduced pitch is largely driven by the rapidly evolving mobile phone market.
(Sep 28, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Cooling Thin Consumer Electronic Devices
Today’s modern electronic devices are more dense and capable than ever before. Cooling these devices is important not only for the reliability and stability of the electronic circuitry, but also for the comfort of the user and the integrity of the display technology.
System-on-chip (SOC) technology has aggregated the functionality of many disparate devices into fewer monolithic circuits. This has had tremendous cost and performance benefits, but tends to concentrate the heat load into smaller volumes. Thinner form factors mean that the heat must be carried away with little space available for insulating critical surfaces.
(Sep 28, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Delivering Optimized High Performance Computing Through Advanced Interconnects

The most important element in the microelectronics performance, be it low power, electrical performance or reliability, is the interconnect from the chip to the package. As the power to drive the signal is reduced to meet thermal performance and extend battery life, the interconnect has to be short, highly conducting and reliable. The wire-bond cannot be used for high IO and high performance; existing lead-free flip chip interconnects face limitations in terms of current carrying capacity and reliability.

(Sep 28, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Henkel Corporation Logo New Wafer Backside Coating Innovation Stacks Up Against Film
Consumers continue to drive demand for smaller, thinner and more capable electronic
devices which, then, require integrated packages that can cope with today’s new
product footprints. For packaging specialists, that means the processing of thinner
wafers and stacking of much thinner die. The catch? All of this has to be achieved at an
end unit cost that is palatable and marketable to tech?savvy consumers.
(Aug 26, 2010, Henkel Corporation)
µPILR™ Flip Chip for High-Performance Applications
The ever increasing market requirements for high-performance, high speed, and densely packaged devices with shrinking form factors have propelled the use of flip chip technology in electronic packages. Flip chip packaging becomes an attractive choice due to its high packaging density, scalable nature and good thermal and electrical performance from shorter electrical paths between the die and the substrate and enhanced power-ground distribution.
High-performance applications including FPGAs, ASICs, microprocessors and graphic processors are already making a transition towards 150µm bump pitch and below. The industry is moving rapidly towards 28nm nodes with aggressive goals to achieve 22nm nodes. However, the trend towards the smaller form factors and reduced pitch is largely driven by the rapidly evolving mobile phone market.
(Aug 25, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Cooling Thin Consumer Electronic Devices
Today’s modern electronic devices are more dense and capable than ever before. Cooling these devices is important not only for the reliability and stability of the electronic circuitry, but also for the comfort of the user and the integrity of the display technology.
System-on-chip (SOC) technology has aggregated the functionality of many disparate devices into fewer monolithic circuits. This has had tremendous cost and performance benefits, but tends to concentrate the heat load into smaller volumes. Thinner form factors mean that the heat must be carried away with little space available for insulating critical surfaces.
(Aug 25, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Delivering Optimized High Performance Computing Through Advanced Interconnects
The most important element in the microelectronics performance, be it low power, electrical performance or reliability, is the interconnect from the chip to the package. As the power to drive the signal is reduced to meet thermal performance and extend battery life, the interconnect has to be short, highly conducting and reliable. The wire-bond cannot be used for high IO and high performance; existing lead-free flip chip interconnects face limitations in terms of current carrying capacity and reliability.
(Aug 25, 2010, Tessera Technologies, Inc.)
Master Bond, Inc., Logo The Coolest Compounds

Through heat dissipation, thermally conductive adhesives and potting compounds play a pivotal role in the protection of today’s electronic circuitry.  In tandem with the great growth of the technological sector comes the need for a new generation of innovative, highly advanced solutions capable of reliable performance in the ever increasing temperatures of electronic devices. Master Bond’s white paper examines the challenges design engineers face as chip makers up the ante on microprocessor power and density, and how thermally conductive adhesives and potting compounds can manage heat while solving other application issues.

(Aug 10, 2010, Master Bond, Inc.,)
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